Hopkins Lectures 2005
Overview & Links

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gerard Manley Hopkins Archive 2005 - Index

The Gerard Manley Hopkins Archive, a free resource, includes lectures on: Gerard Manley Hopkins and the Background to the Breastplate of Saint Patrick; Hopkins and His Saints; The Vision of Gerard Manley Hopkins: "Doomed to succeed by failure"; Father Gerard Hopkins S.J Makes his Annual Retreat; Gerard Manley Hopkins's Influence in the Poems of Elizabeth Bishop.

Search the Gerard Manley Hopkins Archive for hundreds of terrific lectures.

 

Hopkins and the Background to the Breastplate of St. Patrick

Seán Bagnall

Ernest Ferlita, SJ some years ago, described Hopkins's love of the Breastplate.

He also spoke of Hopkins's intention to publish a new critical edition of Saint Patrick's confession. Hopkins was aware of and interested in these documents before he ever came to Ireland.

Read Hopkins and the Background to the Breastplate of St. Patrick

Joseph Darlington S.J: A Living Link between Newman, Hopkins and Joyce

James Pribek S.J Canisius College Buffalo NY USA

People who visit what is now Newman House on St. Stephen's Green in Dublin are greeted by a plaque that celebrates the efforts there of three outstanding figures: John Henry Newman, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and James Joyce. The three were connected in a variety of ways: Newman and Hopkins were bound by spiritual friendship and mentoring; and Joyce expressed his familiarity with and admiration for Newman in no less than forty-one allusions, ...

Read full text Joseph Darlington SJ: a Living Link between Newman, Hopkins and Joyce.

The Vision of Gerard Manley Hopkins: "Doomed to succeed by failure"

Seán P. Kealy, C.S.Sp. Duquesne University, Pittsburg, USA

For so many years my reflections on poetry, influenced by my classical studies in U.C.D., would begin with John Henry Newman's comment in his Grammar of Assent (ch. 4. pt.2 #4, pp. 78 — 79): In more recent years, perhaps due to my more analytical American experience, I now tend to apply the lens of vision in my approach to poetry. Thus I love to tell my students the story about the expert in time management, who, when speaking to a group of business people and with an illustration which they would never forget, challenged them to examine their vision of life.

Read Sean P. Kealey C.Ss.P.on 'The Vision of Hopkins: doomed to succeed by Failture'

 

Father Gerard Hopkins S.J Makes his Annual Retreat
Joseph Feeney SJ St. Joseph's, Philadelphia, USA

Each year, every Jesuit - including Fr. Gerard Hopkins, S.J. —makes his "annual retreat," eight days of prayer and silence, usually following the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola. Its purpose is to look back over the past year in the sight of God, to thank God for what has gone well, to face problems that may have occurred, and to do planning - perhaps make resolutions - for the following year.

Read Father Gerard Hopkins SJ Makes his Annual Retreat

Hopkins and His Saints

Dr hab. Aleksandra Kedzierska University of Maria Curie-Sklodowska Lublin, Poland

In "The Starlight Night", having resisted the treacherous magic of the winter sky, the speaker finally reaches the heavenly barn where, led by the "half-hurl" of his heart, he can bask in the closeness of Christ, "his mother and all his hallows". The glimpse into this agape is by no means the only manifestation of Hopkins's belief in the communio sanctorum whose powerful and mysterious reality is evoked in many of his poems. Not only is this unique togetherness inherent in and sanctioned by Christ's "all in all", but it is also emphasized through numerous references to the sacramental practices of the Church, or else to the support of heaven for the martyrs in the "bloody hour" of their death. Aleksandra Kedzierska on Hopkins and his Saints

Gerard Manley Hopkins's Influence in the Poems of Elizabeth Bishop

Ben Howard Emeritus English Professor Alfred University, NY ,USA

In his sonnet "Duns Scotus's Oxford," Gerard Manley Hopkins pays tribute to a kindred spirit. Contrasting the "graceless growth" of Victorian Oxford with the "grey beauty" of the older buildings, he invokes the memory of the medieval theologian Duns Scotus, the "rarest-veined unraveller," who lectured at Oxford in the early fourteenth century.

Read full text here on Hopkins's Influence on the Poems of Elizabeth Bishop

The Vision of Gerard Manley Hopkins "Doomed to success by Failure"

Seán Kealey CsSP Duquesne University, USA

For so many years my reflections on poetry, influenced by my classical studies in U.C.D., would begin with John Henry Newman's comment in his Grammar of Assent (ch. 4. pt.2 #4, pp. 78 — 79): In more recent years, perhaps due to my more analytical American experience, I now tend to apply the lens of vision in my approach to poetry. Thus I love to tell my students the story about the expert in time management, who, when speaking to a group of business people and with an illustration which they would never forget, challenged them to examine their vision of life.

Links to Hopkins Literary Festival 2005

Monastic Ireland and Saint Patrick || Influence of Hopkins on American Poets || John Henry Newman Influence on Hopkins || Ursula Bethell and Gerard Manley Hopkins ||